Assignment: The Courtship Novel in England

EN 2348 Spring 2008: The Courtship Novel in England
The Research Assignment

Early in the semester I will arbitrarily divide you into groups. Each group will be assigned a particular topic and a particular novel.  Each person in the group will be responsible for writing a summary of a text I assign that pertains to the topic.  As a group, you will use the summaries to figure out how the topic is represented by and/or illuminates the novel. You will then create a 15-minute presentation in which you communicate your conclusions to the class.

The Role of the Family and of the Individual in Courtship

Lawrence Stone, The Family, Sex and Marriage in England: Chapter 7 Mating ArrangementsChapter 8 The Companionate Marriage
Hester Chapone, from Advice to Young Ladies (“On the heart and affections”) [on ANGEL]
Amanda Vickery, The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England Chapter 2: Love and Duty pp. 39-58
Ruth Perry, “Women in Families: The Great Disinheritance” in Women and Literature in Britain, 1700-1800, ed. Vivien Jones

The Modest Heroine

Mary Poovey, Chapter One “The Proper Lady,” The Proper Lady and The Woman Writer
Dr. John Gregory, from A Father’s Legacy to His Daughters [on ANGEL]
Ruth Yeazell, Fictions of Modesty: Chapter 3 The Matter of CourtshipChapter 4 The Matter of Consciousness

Sensibility

Hannah More, “On the Dangers of an Ill-Directed Sensibility” in The Other Eighteenth Century: English Women of Letters 1660-1800, ed. Robert W. Uphaus and Gretchen M. Foster
Janet Todd, Chapter One in Sensibility: an Introduction
G. J. Barker Benfield, selections from The Culture of Sensibility

Marriage and Divorce

Amanda Vickery, The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England: Chapter 2: Love and Duty pp. 59-end of chapter
Lawrence Stone, The Road to Divorce: Chapter 6 Desertion, Elopement and Wife-SaleChapter 7 Private SeparationChapter 10 Parliamentary Divorce
Gillian Skinner, “Women’s Status as Legal and Civic Subjects: ‘A Worse Condition than Slavery Itself?’” in Women and Literature in Britain, 1700-1800, ed. Vivien Jones

Wollstonecraft and the Controversy over Female Nature

Anne K. Mellor, “Wollstonecraft’s Vindication and the Women Writers of her Day,” in The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft
Cora Kaplan, “Mary Wollstonecraft’s Reception and Legacies,” in The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft
Chris Jones, “Mary Wollstonecraftís Vindications and their Political Traditions” inThe Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft
Vivien Jones, “Mary Wollstonecraft and the Literature of Advice and Instruction” inThe Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft
Barbara Taylor, “The Religious Foundations of Mary Wollstonecraftís Feminism” inThe Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft
Claudia Johnson, “Mary Wollstonecraftís Novels” in The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft

Fashionable Life

Amanda Vickery, The Gentleman’s Daughter: Chapter 1 GentilityChapter 5 EleganceChapter 6 Civility and VulgarityChapter 7 Propriety

Female Education

Mitzi Myers, “My Art Belongs to Daddy? Thomas Day, Maria Edgeworth and the Pre-Texts of Belinda” in Revising Women: Eighteenth-Century “Women’s Fiction” and Social Engagement, ed. Paula Backscheider
Amanda Vickery, in The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England: Chapter 7 “Propriety”
Kathryn Sutherland, “Writings on Education and Conduct: Arguments for Female Improvement” in Women and Literature in Britain, 1700-1800, ed. Vivien Jones
Jean Jacques Rousseau, from Emile
Alan Richardson, “Mary Wollstonecraft on Education” in The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft

Money, Modesty, Marriage

Ruth Perry, “Women in Families: The Great Disinheritance” in Women and Literature in Britain, 1700-1800, ed. Vivien Jones.
Claudia Johnson, Jane Austen: Women, Politics and the Novel Chapter One The Novel of CrisisChapter Three Sense and Sensibility: Opinions Too Common and Too Dangerous

For more from this author, please see the essay in the Pedagogy section of this issue.

Nora Nachumi

Aphra Behn

Aphra Behn

Aphra Behn is a pseudonym for ABOPublic. This is not the real Aphra Behn—she died in 1688, and the world hasn't been the same since!
Aphra Behn

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